Rogue Defender

Cats should play field hockey

228,136 notes

thegadaboutgirl:

whowasntthere:

championofazura:

Girls, romanticize yourselves. You are a queen. You are a warrior. You are an enchantress. You are a mermaid. You are a goddess. You are all of these things and more, you are the stuff of fairytales. 

Women, traumatize others. You are a dragon. You are a wolf. You are a bump in the night. You are the last thing they see in the darkness. You are all of these things and more, you are the heart of their fucking nightmares.

image

(Source: sapphiology, via llamasandstars)

42,126 notes

animetrashdemon:

passivefan:

passivefan:

jenniferrpovey:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).
Except.
Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.
So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.
There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).
Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.
IOW?
Reptiles are fascinating.

YOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooooooOOOOOOOOOOOO
So that means that bit I talked about on skype about lesbian dragons being able to reproduce in LotS has a basis!

#THERE AR E LESBIAN LIZARDS HOW CAN PEOPLE STILL SAY HOMOSEXUALITY IS NOT NATURAL

OMFG!

animetrashdemon:

passivefan:

passivefan:

jenniferrpovey:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).

Except.

Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.

So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.

There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).

Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.

IOW?

Reptiles are fascinating.

YOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooooooOOOOOOOOOOOO

So that means that bit I talked about on skype about lesbian dragons being able to reproduce in LotS has a basis!

OMFG!

(via brucetheghoul)

16,000 notes

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

Filed under my geo teacher does stuff with this is cool man

1,155 notes

…A young child born deaf in an indigenous North American nation grew up nearly always being able to communicate with her community. She would not be physically segregated. The expectation would be that if she survived the vagaries of life to which all were exposed, she could find and enjoy a partner, and she would eventually grow old as a treasured elder who tickled and guided the children around her. If all were in balance, she would find her gift—perhaps weaving, perhaps gathering particularly delicious herbs—and share that with her community, who would then share their gifts with her. A successful healing ceremony, if one was needed, would balance and resolve whatever unease might have existed—but certainly no one would expect the young girl to hear, for such a result was unnecessary.

Nearly every indigenous-language group used signed communication to some degree, and many nations shared singed languages despite their verbal difference. Europeans documented use of signed language among North American indigenous peoples as early as the sixteenth century, and anthropologists and linguists agree that it was employed long before contact with Europeans. Signed language has been identified within at least forty different language groups. Today, we know about indigenous signed languages because of its continued use by some elders, the anthropological work of scholars such as the Smithsonian’s Garrick Mallery in the late nineteenth century, films made by Hugh L. Scott in 1930 at the Indian Sign Language Council, and the tenacious scholarship and activism of contemporary linguists such as Jeffery E. Davis.

The most widely used signed language spread across an extensive region of the Great Plains, from Canada’s North Saskatchewan River to the Rio Grande, from the Rocky Mountain foothills to the Mississippi-Missouri valley. What is now referred to as Plains Indian Sign Language (PISL) enabled communication across communities regarding trade, in critical political negotiations, and even in courtship.Great Plains used this “signed lingua franca” as Davis has characterized it, within their communities as an alternative to spoken language for ritual or storytelling purposes—and of course as a primary language for deaf people and those around them.

A Disability History of America by Kim E. Nielsen, page 4 and 5 (via theaubisticagenda)

Although it’s also the case that in a lot of nations, PISL and its equivalents was actually mainly used for international relations and trade, while deaf folks used what’s sometimes called “kitchen sign” (think of it as a spontaneous sign language worked out between the deaf person and the people they live with, whether hearing or not). They might or might not have learned PISL or the other regional equivalents. 

(via blood-and-vitriol)

(Source: theaubisticwaronchristmas, via brucetheghoul)

Filed under Aliaaaaaa